Motorcycle Helmets

Someone told me “Two centuries later and we are still indecisive and arguing over natural rights such as the general right to liberty”.  Many are still fighting the motorcycle laws.  Motorcycle helmets were created not to “spoil” freedoms but create safety.  Nobody wants to experience a head injury. Some want to wear them other feel it’s their right to not wear them.  Is it because they are too big, too heavy to hot? Try a half-helmet. Helmet-less riders not only affect the rider but if and when there is an accident, the insurance premiums go up, backed up traffic and in some instances there are bloody street scenes.  Is it really worth riding un-protected? Is it fun? Not comfortable?  You should try one, it might just change your mind.

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Motorcycle Helmet Debate

There are only two states in the US that have no laws when it comes to motorcycle helmet requirements.  Half of the nation has an “all riders law” and the other is “17 and younger”. It is more important to wear a helmet than to worry about getting a ticket.  Those over 17 are more at risk because they are always riding.  Many studies show that helmets can help reduce your risk of injury in a crash. It is a safe choice to wear a helmet the complies with Federal Motor Vehicle Safety.  More and more motorcyclists are taking over the road in the past few years which makes it more important for them to wear helmets to prevent fatalities.

One of the debates with helmet laws are many feel experienced riders should not wear helmets but children should. The problem is not the experience but being safe.  Those with 10 years of experience and 1 year should both be in a helmet.  Anyone can be in an accident.  Experience or no experience. Many accidents that occur can be the fault of someone else.  48% of accidents occur that is not at the fault of the rider. And some lead to death.  It is ok to enjoy the ride but being safe is important to.  Many experienced riders like the Half Helmets because they don’t cover the whole face.  Some like the Modular because of the protection.

Those states with no helmets laws have a fatality rate higher than those with laws. Most insurance riders carry does not cover their full injury and in worse cases this can cause brain or spinal injuries.  Drivers are required to carry insurance and license.  Helmets should be part of that law.  Not because the rider is not experienced but because the rider needs to be safe. The injury can never be reversed but could have been prevented.

Laws are created for the safety of others and not to be broken by “experienced drivers”.  The law should be the same state to state.  This will not only give reasons less reason to debate but cause less fatalities. The law says drivers must have insurance and valid drivers license wherever you go and punishment can be worse than a ticket if rules are broken.  Nobody has a problem following this law so there should be no problem with providing  a helmet law to be followed by all riders.

Safety

      It is important riders know about a product before purchasing.  Many buy a motorcycle helmets because they know it is part of their safety.  It is important to know if it fits correctly or how to care for it.  If the helmet is not a proper fit, this may be a cause for injury if there is an accident. Most companies provide a chart to help you figure out what size you need before purchasing.  Many popular helmets out there include Motocross Helmets, Modular Helmets and Half Helmets (a.k.a. Shorty). It is very important to know what you are buying and if it will protect you during your ride.  Sellers cannot be responsible if you are injured, disabled or receive a ticket while riding, unless told otherwise. When caring for your helmet, you should handle it as a fragile item and follow and extra instructions given by the manufacturer.  The helmet should be replaced every two to four years or less depending on the use or wear and tear on the helmet.  When using a Modular, Motocross or Half Helmet it is better to replace sooner than later. You want to be more safe than sorry.  It is also important you know about the rules and laws of the helmet. There is a DOT and Snell regulation. DOT is the Federal Government Department of Transportation.  DOT sets standards that need to be sold for Modular, Motocross, and Half Helmets that must be met in public streets. Standard 218 (FMVSS 218) is commonly known as the DOT standard. Snell Memorial Foundation is a private not-for-profit organization that set voluntary standard for helmets as well. Both DOT and Snell use these procedures for testing:

  • Impact – the shock-absorbing capacity of the helmet.
  • Penetration– the helmet’s ability to withstand a blow from a sharp object.
  • Retention– the chin straps ability to stay fastened without breaking or stretching.
  • Peripheral vision– the helmet must provide a minimum side vision of 105 degrees to each side. Most people’s usable peripheral vision is only about 90 degrees to each side.)

Many people that buy helmets are buying because they like the way they look and different fits that work for them.  However it is important to be safe as well.

 thehelmetheads

Motorcycle riders…

…are the most vulnerable road users. Helmets decrease the severity of injury by 72% and likelihood of death by 39%. By 2020, road traffic is expected to be the third leading cause of death. Motorcycle riders not wearing a helmet face a high mortality in the event of a crash. This can be followed by costly medical interventions and long term disability. Motorcycle riding is very popular and motorcycle accidents account for a high proportion of injuries where motorcycles are commonly used. Motorcycle registration has increased by 60% since 1997. Motorcycle fatalities have doubled in this time. Motorcycles make up less than 2% of registered vehicles but account for 11% of total traffic related fatalities. There are many helmets out there that can be worn and enjoyed by the rider. Modular, Motocross and Half Helmets are a few out there to choose from. Modular helmets are good for racing and blocking out the wind. But if you don’t like having your face coved then Half helmets are the way to go. Although only a few states have a no-helmet law, there has been a debate over the legislative laws of motorcycle helmets. These laws have varied and changed over time due to the federal government’s efforts to shape state policies. These policies were put into place primarily to protect citizens from the poor choice of not wearing a helmet in the setting of and crash and also to serve the broader of interest of society by reducing the costly burden of riders.

Motorcycle Helmets

Motorcycle Helmets is a protective head gear worn by motorcycle riders. Motorcycle safety is the primary goal of the helmet. The helmet will help protect, prevent or reduce a head injury that can save the riders life. Many helmets provide additional conveniences such as face shield, ear protection and ventilation There are two component that are protective: a thin, hard, outer shell made from polycarbonate plastic, fiberglass or Kevlar and a thick, soft inner liner made of polystyrene or polypropylene “EPS” foam. The purpose of the outer shell is to prevent the head from being punctured by a pointed object that may hit the helmet. It is also to provide structure to the inner liner so it does not disintegrate upon abrasive contact with pavement.. There are many basic types of helmets; Motocross, Modular and Half Helmets to name a few.

Motor Cross Helmets

Motocross Helmet has visor portions and a extended chin. The visor on The Motocross helmet allows the rider to dip his head providing further protection flying debris during off road riding. It will also block the sun during jumps. The partial open face on the Motocross Helmet gives the rider extra protection with goggles and allows air to flow under during the physical action of riding.

Modular Helmets

Modular helmets, also know and “flip-helmets” or “convertible” is a hybrid between full face and open face for street use. The chin bar of the Modular helmet has a chin bar pivoted by a special lever to allow access to most of the face, as in an open face helmet. Most modular helmets are designed to be worn in the close position when riding, however some modular helmets are dual certified as full face and open face helmet. Anyone wearing the Modular Helmet will find it convenient to eat, drink or have a conversation without removing the helmet or unfastening the chinstrap, making them popular among many riders.

Half Helmets

Half Helmets, also known as Shorty helmets have the same front design as an open face but without a lowered rear I the shape of a bowl. The Half-Helmet provides the minimum coverage allowed by law in the US and some British standards. Half Helmets are made with snaps on the front that can be used for a shield or visor. They have a zip put neck liner that is removable, which is great for warm days to take off and cools days to put on. Because this helmet does not cover the whole face it is not uncommon for riders to wear glasses, shades, or goggles.

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Is it snowing or is it not?

It was snowing about 3 days ago and I haven’t left the house since. I look out the window at 7am and I see light showers. At 11a its nice and sunny so I think maybe I will check the mail today. There’s still a lot of snow out so I put on my snow boots. My thermometer is reading 61 outside. I think I will change the batteries when I get back, it must be broke again. But when I get out there it fells like 65. I actually take off my jacket.  The streets are wet but not icy. I see my neighbor pulling out on his bike with three friends. They are still riding bike in November?  And have on helmets of course. The neighbor has a M&M Modular helmet (thanks to me: www.thehelmetheads.com). The other too, not so sure but I’m still working on them. I cant believe they are still riding in the winter. That means they are buying in the winter.  Enjoy while I can….just found out it will be snowing in the am:(

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